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goldman:

Meryl Meisler couldn’t believe the sight that greeted her when she emerged from the subway in Bushwick, Brooklyn, for the first time, in 1981. “It looked like the photographs that I had seen of Beirut,” she recalled of the cityscape of bombed-out buildings.

Ms. Meisler had come to Bushwick to teach art at a public middle school. “I literally thought to myself, perhaps the other art teacher had been killed,” she said.

Stayin’ Alive - NYTimes.com

The above photo was taken by Meisner. I’ve seen many of her photos at galleries around the neighborhood, and the difference between Bushwick then and now will take your breath away.


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Of course, there are now artist studios upstairs, and a free tattoo party may be in swing down the street. But to a first-time visitor, clutching a MetroCard, the scene is desolate. You are 10 stops out of Manhattan on the L line, in the borderland where Bushwick, Brooklyn, blurs into Ridgewood, Queens. (Welcome to Quooklyn.)

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goldman:

Woodside (and Sunnyside, actually) used to be fairly Irish neighborhoods. They have become much more of a melting pot in recent years, but one thing that still remains are the bars. If you get off the train at the 61st Street/Woodside station and walk up 61st Street, you’ll see about a half-dozen of these old-school pubs. They may not be on any fancy NY Times maps, but I imagine they would be pretty fun spots to watch a World Cup game or two.


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Knapsack, Shape Of The Fear

[This Conversation Is Ending Starting Right Now]

rubenfeld

musicyoushouldlisten:

The shake of the shame
But it hangs around your name
For the first time you’re afraid
And you take what they left
Choke on their success
But you’re nothing anyway