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In New York City, there are about 323,900 people who are out of work, labor statistics show, enough to populate a sizable metropolis. They are your neighbors, your fellow congregants, some of the men and women crammed beside you on the subway or bus. Day in and day out, they are coping with upended lives, struggling to squeeze back into a work force that has squeezed them out.

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Four Ways You Can Seek Back Pay for an Unpaid Internship - ProPublica

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newsweek:

At ProPublica, we’ve heard from a lot of unpaid interns. You’ve told us about walking your boss’s dog, fact-checking for magazines and even doing the same work as federal prosecutors — all for little or no pay.

If you think you might be entitled to minimum wage for your work, you have legal options. Here are a few resources you should know about.

Let’s start with the obvious — you can appeal to your employer directly for wages. If you go that route, know the U.S. Department of Labor’s rules. The Labor Department says if you are interning at a for-profit company, your employer needs to pay you at least minimum wage if any of these things are true:


Source newsweek
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U.S. Appeals Court Defines ‘Instrumentality’ Under the FCPA for First Time - Risk & Compliance - WSJ

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A panel of U.S. appellate judges, in a closely watched case, defined a key word underlying government theories for enforcement of U.S. foreign bribery law.

The three judges in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit on Friday affirmed a lower court’s decision to hand down the longest-ever sentence for violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which bars bribery to foreign officials to get or keep business. The defendants’ challenge centered on the question of the definition of a key term –instrumentality–and how it relates to who counts as a foreign official under the law.

It was the first case to reach the appellate level that dealt with the question of who counts as a foreign official under the FCPA. The 1977 law defines “foreign officials” as “any officer or employee of a foreign government or any department, agency, or instrumentality thereof.” Prosecutors have pursued FCPA cases under a broad definition of “instrumentality” that included state-owned companies and their employees. During oral arguments, the judges pressed lawyers for both sides on what they believed constituted an instrumentality.

The opinion released Friday said the company bribed in the case qualified as an instrumentality “under almost any definition we could craft,” and, in the interest of government and companies both seeking an appellate-level definition of the term, provided one of its own.

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This much is known: Between 1825 and the mid-1850s, it was alive. Seneca Village was home to a variety of Americans. Most were of African descent, but there were also Irish- and German- and maybe some Native Americans, as well. The 1855 state census noted that 264 people lived there. The area had a school, three churches and some cemeteries.

A couple of years later, everyone in the village was told to leave and the neighborhood buildings were razed to clear the way for Central Park. In recent times, historians have begun exploring the village’s past.

But for all the present-day records-probing and sites-excavating, there are still many unknowns surrounding Seneca Village.

One of the greatest mysteries: Researchers have not been able to find a single living descendant of anyone who was a resident of Seneca Village.


Source ponchony