n
rubenfeld

Over the years playing in Fugazi, it had become increasingly clear to me the irony [that] this was my form of expression, and yet the only venues in which I was allowed to perform it were these venues where the economy is based largely on self-destruction. And I don’t think it’s evil; I don’t think it should be shut down. I just thought was strange, when you think about all the arts, that music — rock music, especially — always gets shunted into the bar scene. Which is incredibly ironic considering just how important a role music plays in 16- and 17- and 18-year-old kids’ lives. The idea that these people can’t see these bands who are making this music, only because of the fact that they’re not old enough to drink alcohol, shows you there’s a very deep sickness in that system.

Ian MacKaye on All Things Considered. Today, MacKaye’s main project is his family — which is to say he’s in a band with his wife, Amy Farina. The Evens consists of MacKaye on baritone guitar and Farina on drums, singing in harmony and finding intensity in spareness. The duo has just released its third album, The Odds. Hear them discuss their lives at home and on the road with NPR’s Guy Raz. (via nprmusic)

Source nprmusic